Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide

At 1.59 million deaths per year globally, lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality, responsible for nearly 1 in 5 cancer deaths.1 In Europe, overall 5-year survival is 12.6%, but prognosis is heavily dependent on the stage of the cancer at diagnosis.2

Late stage diagnoses with distant metastasis comprise 57% of all new lung cases—more than localized, regional, and unstaged combined. Therefore, the most commonly diagnosed lung cancer cases also have the poorest prognoses.3 While treating lung cancer has evolved in recent years (eg, identification of driver mutations), new treatment options are needed—especially for patients with metastatic disease.

LUNG CANCER CLASSIFICATION4,5

  • Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (≈85%-90%)
    • Squamous
    • Non-squamous (large cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma)
  • Small cell lung cancer (≈10%-15%)
  • Commonly tested mutations: KRAS, EGFR, ALK

LUNG CANCER AT A GLANCE1,5,6

lung cancer statistics lung cancer statistics
ALK=anaplastic lymphoma kinase; EGFR=epidermal growth factor receptor; KRAS=Kirsten rat sarcoma; NSCLC=non-small cell lung cancer.

RESEARCHING THE ROLE OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM
IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NSCLC

Lung cancer is associated with a high rate of mutations, and research into the potential role of the immune system against lung cancer is ongoing. The interactions between tumour cells and tumour-infiltrating immune cells within the tumour microenvironment have been shown to influence the immune response in NSCLC.7-9 Understanding the role of tumour cells and tumour-infiltrating immune cells may illuminate immune-directed strategies specific to patients with NSCLC.

Tumour-infiltrating immune cells reported In NSCLC

T cells (CD8) in lung cancer

T cells (CD8) in lung tumour10

Tumour-infiltrating immune cells reported In NSCLC

T cells (CD8) in lung cancer

T cells (CD8) in lung tumour10