The PD-L1 pathway is an important target in cancer research

Data suggest that PD-L1 may be one of the primary immunosuppressive drivers in multiple types of cancer. Inhibiting PD-L1 interactions may prevent T-cell suppression throughout the tumour microenvironment.1,2

PD-L1 INTERFERENCE AFFECTS B7.1 AND PD-1 BINDING

Interfering with PD-L1 activity on tumour cells and tumour-infiltrating immune cells may prevent suppressive signaling through B7.1 and PD-1 on activated T cell.1,2

PD-L1 as a potential cancer target PD-L1 as a potential cancer target

Preventing PD-L1 from binding to its receptors on T cells may release the T cells from the inhibitory effect of PD-L1.1

  • Because PD-L1 binding to either B7.1 or PD-1 receptors may lead to T-cell deactivation / activity, preclinical studies suggest that preventing both interactions may enhance T-cell activity1,3

PD-L1 INTERFERENCE SHOULD NOT AFFECT PD-L2 INTERACTIONS

Preclinical studies suggest that interfering with PD-L1 activity does not inhibit PD-L2/PD-1 interactions.1,3

PD-L1 activity does not inhibit PD-L2/PD-1 interactions PD-L1 activity does not inhibit PD-L2/PD-1 interactions

PD-L2 is primarily expressed on normal tissues and immune cells, protecting them during an immune response to maintain immune homeostasis as suggested by preclinical studies.1,3-5

  • Direct targeting of PD-L1 (unlike the targeting of PD-1) leaves the PD-L2/PD-1 interaction intact, potentially preserving peripheral immune homeostasis1,5
  • Preventing autoimmune responses is an important consideration in cancer immune research6